Justice Park

October 19, 2009

I was just walking by Euclid at 14th and noticed a big sign for a new park development called “Justice Park.”

The language I see in this neighborhood irks me a little bit, most notably, the “Victory Heights” building on Kenyon and 14th, so the irony here struck me hard. Upon further research, I found a Prince of Petworth commenter say that the park is named after an Atlanta Brave’s Outfielder, David Justice, who is helping fund the project, which looks like it will primarily be a community garden. Hopefully I can get a spot for next season! It’ll be nice to have space to do some farming so close to home.

You can find the DC Parks and Rec’s page on Justice Park here.

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2 Responses to “Justice Park”

  1. rockcreek Says:

    “I found a Prince of Petworth [comment] that the park is named after an Atlanta Brave’s Outfielder, David Justice, who is helping fund the project”

    The Council’s “Justice Park Act of 2003” indicates it has been going by that name since at least ‘95. There are a few possible sources / justifications for the name in the text of the Act:

    “The park sits on the hill above the corridor that was decimated by the riots
    that followed the killing of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. With a fountain inside the park that is slated to be restored, the site calls to mind the phrase that King invoked, ‘Let justice flow down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.'”

    “The park was formerly the site of the Teferis [sic] Israel Synagogue, and as such
    is viewed by many as sacred ground and a place that should be used to inspire the struggle for is viewed by many as sacred ground and a place that should be used to inspire the struggle for justice for all.”

    “At the other end of the 1400 block of Euclid 49 years ago, Queen Julianne
    of the Netherlands gave a historic speech at Meridian Hill to celebrate her country’s surviving the Nazi scourge. In dedicating the Netherlands Carillon, now located at Arlington Cemetery, she rang the smallest bell in the Carillon, saying, ‘We must always listen to the smallest bells, for they are symbols of justice.'”

    Etc. Not sure which, if any of these, is correct. See: http://www.dccouncil.washington.dc.us/images/00001/20030110133350.pdf

    This is replacing the existing Justice Park across the street:

    Justice Park

  2. a Says:

    yea, “justice”, “victory” “dc usa” on the surface, its sounding a bit jingoistic.


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